Tag Archives: spiritual

The Fifth Element

lake-peten-itza-guatemala

Lake Petén Itzá – El Remate, Guatemala. Photo by JJM (2015).

The Fifth Element

 *For background on the Mayan Fifth World and the Fifth Element, please see: The Mayan World Tree

Enter the Fifth Element

Five years have passed since December 2012; we are five years into the Mayan Fifth World and the Fifth Element has entered the scene. We are in a new age of transparency and below-the-surface shadows are bound to be illuminated while submerged debris is likely to float to the top. Whatever is hidden may be exposed and the only way to deal with this alchemical process, is to put one’s own inner house in order.

While there are people who have already been introspecting by way of traditional or spiritual practices, serious self-observation or deeper inner reflection may be something relatively new to others. However, as time passes, not exposing one’s true self will become increasingly difficult. This may be positive news for people who already live from their authentic selves, while it could turn out to be a somewhat uncomfortable experience for those who have not developed their natural identity.

Typically, individuals and groups who avoid facing their inner shadow(s), tend to project them onto others. The objective is to divert attention away from their shadows (and what they are up to). This is a well-know psychological phenomenon. However, in an age of added transparency, such projections would become more obvious. As one finger points to others, four fingers point back. This causes the emperors to wear no clothes by exposing themselves, while remaining oblivious of the fact.

This is the first part of a ‘miniseries’: an article published in parts. To be continued soon…

Also see: The Shift of the Stages

J.J. Montagnier is an intuitive creative writer. He is a student of mythology, ancient cultures, philosophy, psychology, sociology, politics and metaphysics. His writings are inspired and influenced by his extensive world travels, personal observations, life experiences and research.  

Copyright © 2016 · All Rights Reserved · Gypsy Café

Originally published at: GypsyCafe.org


Choose Conscience

choose-peace-through-conscience

Peace Mural, Belfast, N. Ireland (2004). Archive photo by JJM.

When faced with difficult choices, especially amongst bad options, conscience can always show the way. Needless to say, what the planet needs right now, more than ever, is a return to conscience. Conscience lends itself to a variety of peaceful solutions.

Moral relativity does not fit well into the realm of a well developed and active conscience. Conscience intuitively knows the difference between right and wrong. What is appropriate or correct within a given context or what is not. What is creative and what is destructive. What is life-giving and what is life-killing. What is nurturing and what is eroding. What is authentically (not superficially) progressive and what is truly regressive.

Not all situations call for distinctions to be made, but when they do, a healthy conscience would normally step in automatically. Of course, conscience interacts with ethics, etiquette, morality, religion and other frameworks for rules of conduct, but personal conscience can and does act autonomously, and will override externally imposed morality, where necessary. As long as conscience is maintained, conscience is the only inner guiding system which has almost full  independence and autonomy. It is independent from the ego-self and the group-self and it is autonomous in prompting one to correct one’s course.

Conscience will override questionable morals and will adjust approaches and actions accordingly. Conscience is an autonomous guidance system within, whereas morals depend on customs and norms without. The more relative morals become in a society as a whole, the more consciousness dims collectively and the more unconscious society becomes as a group. It is during such times that inner conscience is especially needed to guide individuals.

Only a very small percentage of individuals are born without any conscience at all – and they are considered to be “disabled” (psychologically), meaning that they don’t have the full range of emotions and feelings that would usually be accessible to the average person. They are also unlikely to ever develop (a) conscience. Other than these exceptions, conscience holds much more universality than ethics or morals do, and therefore we would be much better off aspiring to universal conscience than universal morals or ethics. A healthy conscience leads to expanded consciousness on an individual level, which is expressed on a universal level.

The small percentage of conscience-less (without conscience) individuals we find in society are naturally the proverbial  “foxes” as described in the Chicken Little fable (See Parts 5 & 7) and we find them in all walks of life. However, there is a significant percentage of average individuals who eventually revert to similar behaviors after having lost (or given up) their consciences as they went along. Very often a conscious decision was made to do so, in order to gain certain advantages. The nature of conscience itself does not allow for it to be given up unconsciously, so the suppression of conscience is certainly a conscious process initially and subsequently the decision is swiftly put out of mind and henceforth avoided at all costs.

If the majority of individuals in a society learn to suppress their conscience – to the extent that a general moral relativity sets in – and once the virtues of conscience are lost by adults in general, they are unlikely to be instilled, cultivated or strengthened within children either. When a society has more “foxes” than “chickens”, parasitism, prejudice, projection, exploitation, bigotry, double standards, hypocrisy, abuse of power, corruption and the active destruction of old value systems ensue and a general regression leading to potential repression sets in. A strong accompanying feature of such a scenario is often decadence.

It has been determined that historically mass decadence (and sometimes war) has almost always preceded the collapse of civilizations. In other words, the idea of the destruction of values on the basis of them being “old fashioned” or “conservative” in order to facilitate decadence (boundary-less living) often have unintended consequences, because all systems need structure in order to function, externally and (importantly) internally – structure being what value systems are meant to provide in societies and civilizations. No limits, no restrictions, no boundaries, means no structure, which results in a vacuum. In a big enough vacuum, collapse is inevitable.

Therefore, going forward, decisions and choices based on conscience may be the only available tool to rescue (individuals in) a declining civilization from internal (and external) collapse. Conscience can save individuals, and in the present-day context, the world.

By Jean-Jacques M

Originally published at gypsycafe.org


The Maya World Tree

The Roots of a Ceiba Tree at Copán, Honduras, Central America. Photograph by Jean-Jacques Morin, September 2015.

The Roots of a Ceiba Tree at Copán, Honduras, Central America. Photographed by Jean-Jacques Morin, September 2015.

In Mesoamerican theology the sacred World Tree stands in the centre of the world, crossing and connecting three horizontal levels, the heavens, the earth and the underworld. It has its roots embedded deep in the underworld, with its trunk straight and sturdy in the earthly realm and its branches high up in the heavens, diverging into the four cardinal directions.

According to Maya mythology the World Tree allowed human souls to come to be and this is symbolised by the White flowers of Ceiba trees, which are still found in Maya lands today. Following that, the biological human bodies which souls reside in allowed them to pass through the experience of life on earth. All souls came from one of the four cardinal directions, defining not only characteristics and personality traits, but also general destiny.

READ MORE (+ view 2 more photographs)

Photographs and text by Jean-Jacques M.

Copyright © 2015 – All Rights Reserved – Gypsycafe.org


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